Saturday, July 23, 2011

The Invisible Mend.





Well, after considerable rummaging I have turned up the directions for the Swiss darning mend mentioned in my last post. I hope you can make some sense of it. I have used it twice before, once for a bachelor friend, to fix a hole in his Sunday best sweater, and the other for another friend whose puppy had chewed a hole in her husband's brand new sweater. Oh dear. In the interests of the popularity of both the puppy and my friend I had to make that mend as un-noticeable as possible. The problem, in both cases, was that I didn't have matching wool but found as near a match as possible and both of my friends were happy with the result.
The mend is started by using a crochet hook to pick up any stitches that have run, then using a thin strand of yarn connect the stitches at the top and bottom of the hole with long stitches so that you can use them as a foundation for your mend. Next take your mending yarn (the same thickness as the knitted stitches) and work back and forth across the hole in duplicate stitch, working a few stitches into the knitting at each side to ensure that the damage won't spread. Finally turn the work to the wrong side and darn all loose ends away. Your mend may not look as good as new, but it should look better than a darn.
Another good way to cover a hole is to crochet little flowers to scatter all over the sweater, covering the hole with one of the flowers. - Presto! A new sweater. Though I'm not sure how a male would take to that idea for his sweater.
Must go now. I hope all is well at your place. Bye for now until next time.

8 comments:

  1. Very helpful diagrams. I guess the tricky part is picking up the stitches that have run! I couldn't see the mend in your photos so it obviously works!

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  2. Thankyou so much for taking the time to find this for us.. A simple but effective method of mending..
    Hope your weekend is a warm one :))

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  3. Minding my Own: It takes a bit of practice but it does work.

    Pat: I wonder what it's like in your corner of Tas. Good 'curling up with knitting' weather here - or chrochet, as the mood takes you. I'm working on both at pres.

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  4. Sounds very involved, they're lucky to have someone like who can do the repair. I would be a puppyless home after that I think. Can't see having a pet that ruins items.

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  5. Hello Sandy. I think this was a close call. Fortunately puppies grow out of the chewing stage. I remember a labrador that took it's toll of a few of the children's toys as a pup but became a very sedate older lady.

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  6. Ah! How clever! Any pictures of the finished repair?

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  7. Hello knitreadclick. This is the method that I mentioned in the previous blog. The mend photographed was a little more complicated because I had to copy the double moss (seed) stitch. It worked well enough to allow me to wear the cardigan without embarrassment.

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  8. Thankyou for this, I have used the images to print out a reference sheet for myself.

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